Beware, Dental X-rays Can Trigger Brain Tumor

Dental X-rays Can Trigger Brain Tumor | For those of you who frequent dental check using x-ray, should be wary. A recent study in the United States, published on 10 April 2012 in 'journal Cancer' indicates, they often undergo X-rays of the teeth have a greater risk of tumors in the head commonly called a meningioma cancer.

These tumors grow on the inner lining of the skull. Most growing slowly, but they can cause problems and can even be deadly, if it begins to put pressure on the brain.

In his study, scholars from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass., make the observation of two methods of radiation (x-ray) is called a "bitewing" and Panorex.

The research involved nearly 3,000 adults aged 20-79 years, about half (1433 people) among those diagnosed with tomor. Researchers found that patients often undergo radiation x-ray or dental X-rays in the area associated with a higher risk of developing cancer.

Specifically, patients who have had a Panorex checks once a year or more, have a risk 2.7 to 3 times greater meningoma cancer, depending on age, rather than people who have never done this x-ray. While participants who had X-rays "bitewing" at least annually, the risk is 1.4 to 1.9 times greater with meningioma cancer.

Meningioma is a tumor of the membranes that cover the brain, which is more common in women than men, especially in the age of 50-60 years. But, most meningiomas are benign.

Study author Dr. Elizabeth Claus, said although the patients with dental problems currently getting a lower radiation exposure than in the past, but the researchers asked the dentist and patient to consider when and why it is necessary X-rays.

"I hope this research will help to raise awareness about the optimal use of dental x-rays," he said.

Guidelines from American Dental Association says, kids can get a one-time exposure every 1 or 2 years; for teenagers once in the period from 1.5 to 3 years, while adults can get the exposure once in three years 2-3.

Meanwhile, Michael Schulder, vice chairman of the department of neurosurgery of Cushing Neuroscience Institute, is not surprised by these findings.

"The possibility of tumor in patients undergoing dental radiation is low. However, dentists and patients should consider again that too much radiation each year, unless there are symptoms in dental patients who really need radiation," he concluded.
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